© Register of One-Place Studies 2013-2016

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Cornwall

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The following study has been registered and is also on the Worldwide One-Place Study Register:


Cornwall

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Cornwall OPC

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Grampound Road (part), Tresillian (part)


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Probus

The parish of Probus, extending to just over 8,000 acres, is approximately 4 miles north east of the City of Truro. It is bounded on the north by the parishes of Ladock and St Stephen in Brannel, on the east by Grampound, Creed, and Cuby, on the south by Cornelly, Lamorran, and Merther, and on the west by St Clement's and St Erme.

The parish, and village, are named after St Probus, to whom the church is dedicated. He appears to have been a British Christian, who is believed to have lived at some time in the late 5th century, but little more is known. King Athelstan founded a monastic centre in Probus in 930 A.D., as part of his programme of converting the Celts to a Saxon way of life.




John Evans

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CornwallOPCs

@CornwallOPCs


-

2011

Active



Apprenticeship indentures, settlement papers, bastardy documents, manorial documents

7 December 2013

johnrpevans@hotmail.co.uk


Yes


After the Norman conquest, the church was given to Exeter Cathedral, and although the monastery survived with a Dean and Canons, in 1268 the deanery was surrendered to the Bishop of Exeter and ceased to exist.

The present church, built of Cornish granite in the Perpendicular Gothic style, dates in the main from about 1450. The tower at 125’ 10”, rightly famous as being the tallest in Cornwall, was started in about 1523 and finished in Elizabeth I’s reign. There was a chapel in the village, alas no longer open for worship, and also a private school which drew pupils from different parts of the county.

Probus One-Place Study