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Cornwall

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The following study has been registered and is also on the Worldwide One-Place Study Register:


Cornwall

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Enniscaven, Gothers, Whitemoor


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St. Dennis

St Dennis village is four miles south-east of St Columb and about six north-west from St Austell. The parish is bounded on the north-west by the river Fal which divides it from St Columb, Roche, St Stephen in Brannel and St Enoder. Its situation is on the ridge which passes through the middle of Cornwall. Before St Dennis became a parish in its own right, the priest's living was vested in St Michael Penkivel along with St Stephen in Brannel.

The population of the parish in 1801 was only 318, but expanded rapidly with the discovery of kaolin or china clay, to 1632 in 1901 and the present population of 2810. This is a mining district and is famous for china clay and granite, better known as 'St Stephen china stone', which is much used as internal dressings of many of the neighbouring parish buildings. There are also many farms, some of which are now buried under clay waste. The Manor houses were Demeliock #Domellick#, Ennis Caven, #formerly Arundlels#, Hendra and Menna, #Boscawen#, Restowrick, Gaverigan. Until the mid 1800s, St Dennis consisted of 3 hamlets - Hendra, Trelavour and Whitepit - and in addition there was Enniscaven, Gothers and part of Whitemoor. By all accounts at one time Enniscaven was the largest part.

Jessie Evans

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johnrpevans@hotmail.co.uk

John Evans

2001

Active



Tin mines were less common in St Dennis than in neighbouring parishes. Among these were ‘Great Prosper’ producing tin 1888-1891. These were open works owned by the Great Prosper China Clay & Stone Company. The ‘St Dennis Consols’ produced tin in 1860 and were suspended 1865 and the ‘St Dennis Crown’ opened 1901 but was abandoned in 1907.

Priorities for 2014:  Transcribing outstanding records

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2 Dec 2013

Yes


St Dennis, to whom the church is dedicated, is said to have been born in Athens. The church is situated on the hill almost in the centre of the parish, and is mentioned in Domesday Book. Very little can be ascertained about the history of the church but it is known that the stone cross in the churchyard is of great antiquity. The exact date the church was built is unknown but the tower contains two bells dated 1167 and 1176. The treble bell contains the date 1651 and the tenor bell is engraved 1738 with Church Wardens' names John VARCOE and Abraham GRIGG. Both surnames are still in the parish.

When searching for an elusive family in this area it is necessary to look in both St Dennis and St Stephen in Brannel. Both parishes have china clay labourers who worked in either parish from time to time as new clay works were opening frequently. Men and women often lived for time to time in either parish. Evidence of this can be found in the burial registers and census records. Often children were born in other neighbouring parishes showing the movement of families in search of work. Sometimes children were not baptised shortly after birth, and were only baptised a few weeks before they were due to marry when it was a requirement.

St. Dennis One-Place Study